Where is Earth’s centrifigual force?

Q: Why don’t we feel the centrifugal force of Earth’s orbit? It should make us feel lighter at night, when we’re lying on the outside of the swing, and heavier during day, when we’re standing on the inside. After all, when you’re at the fair and you ride the famous Rotor (or its inferior successors, the Round Up and Gravitron), this force is strong enough to pin you against the wall.

I did this in 1977, at the Dade County Youth Fair, with my dad. It was one of the happiest days of my life and it occurred during the happiest year in US history. In 1977, KISS released Love Gun; also, Star Wars came out.
I did this in 1977, at the Dade County Youth Fair, with my dad. It was one of the happiest days of my life and it occurred during the happiest year in US history. In 1977, KISS released Love Gun; also, Star Wars came out.
This is the POS Round Up. No dropping floor, and each victim is embraced by a tiny cage. Non-insane children found this ride offensively lame.
This is the POS Round Up. No dropping floor, and each victim is embraced by a tiny cage. Non-insane children found this ride offensively lame.
This is the POS Gravitron. It looks cool from the outside.
This is the POS Gravitron. It looks cool from the outside.
This is the interior of the POS Gravitron. The floor drops 12 inches and the wall is on an incline. Even worse than the Round Up.
This is the interior of the POS Gravitron. The floor drops 12 inches and the wall is on an incline. Even worse than the Round Up.

So again I ask: Why can’t we notice any wall-smooshing force from our orbit?

A: For the average (70Kg) person, that centrifugal force is equivalent to approximately 0.000000000000000024 times Earth's gravitational pull at sea level. Converted to understandable units, for a 70Kg person the force would be 30 millionths of the weight of a head hair.