Tutorial: Making an OutMap Agent

BoxPress can now design outline-ordered HTML imagemaps with incredible ease.

Make the agent, dismiss pop-over, set prototype

Just make an agent, click on the current tab to remove the pop-over, and immediately set its prototype to outmaker_note.

Then name it. I have named mine OutAgent: Demo. This will (1) create the all-important origin_adorn adornment automatically, (2) set the agent information for you, and (3) bring up a special set of key attributes. Here’s the automatically generated agent info.

Set the source and depth attributes

Now set $outSource to the name of the source note, and set $outDepth to the outline depth you want to include:

Here is the Key Attribute Table for our OutAgent.
Here is the Key Attribute Table for our OutAgent.

I have chosen to make an OutMap for the PAGE Sampler: Default export container, whose contents are shown here:

The container whose contents I will be OutMapping.
The container whose contents I will be OutMapping.

The depth is relative to the source note, so an $outDepth of 1 will only include the source note’s children—and the resulting outline will only have top-level headings. I have set $outDepth to 6. Since the mapped container only goes to depth 5, all 15 notes are collected. They are automatically sorted by outline order:

The aliases have been collected. Note that the source container and depth have been added to the agent’s display name.
The aliases have been collected. Note that the source container and depth have been added to the agent’s display name.
Same thing in Map View.
Same thing in Map View.

Run the MapMaker OutMap stamp

Now for the climax. Select all the notes and run the MapMaker•OutMap stamp. Doing this will resize and arrange them into an OutMap whose columns are $outRowMax long:

HOVER to see the effect of running the stamp.
HOVER to see the effect of running the stamp.

Note that after running, the agent self-deactivates (by setting its $AgentPriority to -1) since refreshing an agent destroys the positions and sizes of its contents. To refresh the agent contents (and destroy your layout), change the -1 to the default (1) and then update the agent.

Adjust origin_adorn

Resize origin_adorn so that your diagram fits inside its boundary. The notes inside its area will export as image links, and any notes outside it will not.

If you want to change its title, change its display expression, not its $Name.

Transparent Links Area
To make the adornment transparent, set its $Color to white. All Tinderbox map backgrounds covert to white when you Copy View As Image them to the clipboard (see below).

Run one of the MapStyler stamps

And definitely apply one of the MapStyler stamps. Consider at least running the MapStyle•Basic to improve the font and remove the ugly Count and Bips SmartExpression segments:

After titling the adornment and running ^do(Stamp,
After titling the adornment and running MapStyle•Basic.

Or for a fancier look, run MapStyle•Plates:

After titling the adornment and running ^do(Stamp,
After titling the adornment and running MapStyle•Plates.

Applying special colors to headings 1 and 2

You can also change the $Color value of all and only h1 (depth=1) and h2 (depth=2) notes. Here, I have set $outH1 to a deep purple. Select all again and run the MapStyle•Plates stamp. (Heading colors could have been set during the initial run of MapMaker•OutMap, by the way.) Here is the result:

After running ^do(Stamp,
After running MapMaker•OutMap again. This time, it’s applying the non-empty $outH1 values.

To make any note an Imagemap Exporter, set its $blogMapView and $blogMapJPG

Now, to use your OutMap as an HTML Imagemap, follow the usual procedure. Do Copy View As Image, do New from Clipboard in Preview, save as JPEG in your IMAGEMAPS folder, crop to the boundary of origin_adorn and resave.

Then you can use this HTML Imagemap in any of your posts! Just set $blogMapView to OutAgent: Demo and $blogMapJPG to the filename (or path, if in a subfolder) you saved in Preview.

Actual result

Here is the result:

BONUS: Since the above iframe contains a webpage that links to this page here, you get to enjoy a potential infinite regress … and meditate.

Remind you of anything? It’s the structure of epistemic self-representation. For more on the use of concrete possible infinities as a meditation technique, see Rudy Rucker’s Infinity and the Mind.
Remind you of anything? It’s the structure of epistemic self-representation. For more on the use of concrete possible infinities as a meditation technique, see Rudy Rucker’s Infinity and the Mind.